Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Clockwork Princess (The Infernal Devices #3) by Cassandra Clare: review

Goodreads rating: 4.64
Hardcover, 568 pages
Published March 19th 2013 by Margaret K. McElderry Books
Series: The Infernal Devices #3
Source: Bought
Genre: YA Paranormal Steampunk Romance

Danger and betrayal, secrets and enchantment in the breathtaking conclusion to the Infernal Devices trilogy. 

Tessa Gray should be happy - aren't all brides happy?
Yet as she prepares for her wedding, a net of shadows begins to tighten around the Shadowhunters of the London Institute.
A new demon appears, one linked by blood and secrecy to Mortmain, the man who plans to use his army of pitiless automatons, the Infernal Devices, to destroy the Shadowhunters. Mortmain needs only one last item to complete his plan. He needs Tessa. And Jem and Will, the boys who lay equal claim to Tessa's heart, will do anything to save her.


WARNING: SPOILERS FROM BOOKS 1 & 2

What can I say guys? First thing I have to say is that I'm glad Clare is absolutely ending this series at three books. I feel like she stretched the Mortal Instruments past its limit, and the only reason I've read the subsequent books after City of Glass is because I love her writing and her characters are amazing. This book was everything I was hoping: heart-wrenching, bone-chilling, soul-crushing, and beautiful beyond words. I'm not completely satisfied with the ending, but I can't see any other way for it to have ended without completely shattering Tessa's heart. Tessa is meant to marry Jem (though I always felt like she did it just because he was dying and she wanted to give him the life he wanted if even for a short time, knowing that when he died, she and Will could find a way to be together), but the love triangle isn't the only thing plaguing Tessa's life. Mortmain is still bent on owning his creation and he will do anything to have her, but the Shadowhunters at the Institute will do anything to keep Tessa away from him. Tessa still has no idea what she is, though she does know that her mother was tricked into sleeping with a demon by Mortmain. But his obsession runs deeper than that and for a terrible purpose. I really can't give anything away, so this review will be a little shorter than I would like.

Clare has written one of the most convincing love triangles. I don't love Jem and have never loved Jem or been confused as to if I should feel that kind of affection for him, but I can see the allure of him personality-wise. I just don't find Jem physically attractive. Some girls/women like that look of half-Asian, and I have to admit that it works for some people. But that white hair; I just can't get over the white hair. And I know it's because of the drug that is keeping him alive while at the same time slowly killing him, but the only part of Jem that I'm attracted to is his personality and that's not enough. For me, Will has it all. Now that he knows there's no curse over him to kill the people he loves (which is why he left his parents and sister and came to the London Institute), he bared his soul to Tessa. But Jem had already proposed to her. You could tell she was conflicted the entire time by her decision, though she often didn't think it much less talk about it. Not only do both boys mean so much to her, but they mean the world to each other, and that's what makes it so hard and also makes this a perfect love triangle. Because even though I had my favorite without ever being on the fence, I loved Jem too, just differently. I could see what both Tessa and Will saw in him, but I also couldn't help hating him for not seeing how Will felt about Tessa despite the fact that they were parabatai.

There were also other relationships in this book that were already starting in Clockwork Prince, but they turned out perfectly which kind of annoyed me. I know that it made sense with the family trees on the back of the dust jacket (which I would recommend NOT looking at until after you read the book; it's very spoilery), but a few loose ends is what makes a series end perfectly to me. That's why I loved City of Glass so much; everything important was taken care of but there were some things left to interpretation. Clockwork Princess left nothing for interpretation. As always, I love Cassandra Clare's writing. It's beautiful and she is one of the only authors that actually inspires my own writing, though I wish there had been more twists and turns as there had been in the two previous books. I did love the added element of Will's sister Cecily. She was a window into Will's past that we hadn't gotten to see before, and though she was never trained as a Shadowhunter, it was in her blood just like it was with Clary in the Mortal Instruments series. I'm so sad to see this series end, but I hope to see some of them again hopefully in City of Heavenly Fire.


Ugh that ending KILLED me! And like I said above, I get it. I really do. Tessa gets to be with Will for his entire lifetime and he dies an old man and they have children (right?). But then she gets to be with Jem when he becomes a Silent Brother for so much longer. I am not happy about this ending at all, but there was no other option that wouldn't break the hearts and souls of the entire love triangle and all of the involved characters. I honestly wouldn't have minded if Jem had died, but I know the characters wouldn't have lived through a shock like that.

No comments:

Post a Comment

I always appreciate comments and cherish every one of them. THIS IS AN AWARD-FREE ZONE. I don't have the time to fulfill the requirements for the awards, but thank you so much for thinking of me. I just ask for no vulgarity, and if you have any issues with my reviews or writing style, please e-mail me instead of commenting. Now, vent to your heart's content!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Disclaimer

According to FTC guidelines, I'm obligated to share with you that all of the books that I review on my blog are either purchased by me or given to me by an author/publisher. All of the opinions expressed in my reviews are mine and I do not receive any sort of monetary goods for writing either good or bad reviews.